Rise and Shine: What Kids Around the World Eat for Breakfast- NY Times

did you see this article from the new york times? it’s a fun and super informative piece featuring what kids eat for breakfast all over the world. the pictures are too sweet and the menu is intriguing. we tend to stick with porridge or toast and berries or bananas on the weekdays and french toast or pancakes on the weekends. always with a glass of milk or orange juice- depending on each kids’ tastes. what about yours?

enjoy this fun piece from the new york times

<p>Saki Suzuki, 2 ¾ years old, Tokyo</p>
<p>The first time Saki ate the fermented soybean dish called <em>natto</em>, she was 7 months old. She promptly vomited. Her mother, Asaka, thinks that perhaps this was because of the smell, which is vaguely suggestive of canned cat food. But in time, the gooey beans became Saki’s favorite food and a constant part of her traditional Japanese breakfasts. Also on the menu are white rice, miso soup, <em>kabocha</em> squash simmered in soy sauce and sweet sake (<em>kabocha no nimono</em>), pickled cucumber (Saki’s least favorite dish), rolled egg omelet (<em>tamagoyaki</em>) and grilled salmon.</p>

Saki Suzuki, 2 ¾ years old, Tokyo

The first time Saki ate the fermented soybean dish called natto, she was 7 months old. She promptly vomited. Her mother, Asaka, thinks that perhaps this was because of the smell, which is vaguely suggestive of canned cat food. But in time, the gooey beans became Saki’s favorite food and a constant part of her traditional Japanese breakfasts. Also on the menu are white rice, miso soup, kabocha squash simmered in soy sauce and sweet sake (kabocha no nimono), pickled cucumber (Saki’s least favorite dish), rolled egg omelet (tamagoyaki) and grilled salmon.

Americans tend to lack imagination when it comes to breakfast. The vast majority of us, surveys say, start our days with cold cereal — and those of us with children are more likely to buy the kinds with the most sugar. Children all over the world eat cornflakes and drink chocolate milk, of course, but in many places they also eat things that would strike the average American palate as strange, or worse.

Breakfast for a child in Burkina Faso, for example, might well include millet-seed porridge; in Japan, rice and a putrid soybean goop known as natto; in Jamaica, a mush of plantains or peanuts or cornmeal; in New Zealand, toast covered with Vegemite, a salty paste made of brewer’s yeast; and in China, jook, a rice gruel topped with pickled tofu, strings of dried meat or egg. In Cuba, Brazil and elsewhere in Latin America, it is not uncommon to find very young children sipping coffee with milk in the mornings. In Pakistan, kids often take their milk with Rooh Afza, a bright red syrup made from fruits, flowers and herbs. Swedish filmjolk is one of dozens of iterations of soured milk found on breakfast tables across Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. For a child in southern India, the day might start with a steamed cake made from fermented lentils and rice called idli. “The idea that children should have bland, sweet food is a very industrial presumption,” says Krishnendu Ray, a professor of food studies at New York University who grew up in India. “In many parts of the world, breakfast is tepid, sour, fermented and savory.”

READ SO MUCH MORE HERE!

{photo & article courtesy of New York Times}

1 Comment

  1. by regina on October 18, 2014  7:52 am Reply

    This is so cool! I love how it points out that not liking certain foods are a learnt behaviour. Thanks for sharing

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